London Daily

Focus on the big picture.

China Deleting Online Videos Showing Poverty: Report

China Deleting Online Videos Showing Poverty: Report

According to The New York Times, behind the ban is a government eager to keep all talk about China positive.
Due to propaganda and censorship, many people in China are not aware of how prevalent poverty is in the country, The New York Times reported.

Recently, a video of a retiree went viral that showed what groceries she could buy with 100 yuan, or USD 14.50, roughly her monthly pension and sole source of income. The video was later deleted by Chinese authorities.

A singer vented the widespread frustration among young, educated Chinese about their dire finances and gloomy job prospects, like gig work. "I wash my face every day, but my pocket is cleaner than my face," he sings. "I went to college to help rejuvenate China, not to deliver meals." His song was banned and his social media accounts were suspended, as per The New York Times.

Last year, a migrant worker labouring hard to support his family, gained widespread sympathy and attention after he tested positive for COVID-19, and officials released extensive details of his movements. He became known as the hardest-working person in China. Censors blocked discussions about him, and local authorities were stationed outside his house to prevent journalists from visiting his wife.

According to China, it is a socialist country that aims to promote common prosperity. In 2021, its top leader, Xi Jinping, declared "a comprehensive victory in the battle against poverty." Yet many people remain poor or live just above the poverty line. With the country's economic prospects dimming and the people's increasing anxiety about their future, poverty has become a taboo subject that can draw ire from the government.

The Cyberspace Administration of China in March announced that it would crack down on anyone who publishes videos or posts that "deliberately manipulate sadness, incite polarization, create harmful information that damages the image of the Party and the government, and disrupts economic and social development."

It bans sad videos of old people, disabled people and children.

According to The New York Times, behind the ban is a government eager to keep all talk about China positive. The Communist Party brags about how many people it lifted out of poverty in the past four decades, while refusing to mention how it had thrown the entire nation into abject poverty under Mao Zedong.

Poverty alleviation is a medal the party flaunts to claim its legitimacy. But despite China's rise as an economic power, it has a drastically inadequate social safety net, and the government is eager to block any discussion of the conditions poor people face.

Searching the Chinese word "pinkun," or poverty, on the country's biggest news portal, qq.com, the top news item is about research that shows poverty is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. The news media seldom report poverty's systemic causes in China, as per The New York Times.
Comments

Brad 1 year ago
The US government propaganda about America's homeless is exactly the same.

Newsletter

Related Articles

London Daily
0:00
0:00
Close
World Court Orders Immediate Halt to Israeli Offensive in Gaza
Understanding FLiRT COVID Variants and Their Impact
Baltic NATO Members to Construct 'Drone Wall'
Global Life Expectancy Dropped By 2 Years Due To COVID-19
Macron Halts New Caledonia Voting Reform After Riots
Rishi Sunak Shelves Rwanda and Smoking Policies Ahead of Election
US Refuses World Court Jurisdiction
China Conducts Surprise Military Drills Around Taiwan
Grim Polls Predict Major Loss for PM Rishi Sunak
Rishi Sunak's Campaign for UK Election: Key Issues Highlighted
German Property Crisis Worsens as Foreign Investment Declines
Princess of Wales's Taskforce Calls for Business Investment in Early Childhood
Campaign Groups Condemn UK Report on Protests
Former Royal Marine Charged with Espionage Found Dead
Australian PM Calls for Julian Assange's Freedom
ICC Seeks Arrest Warrants for Israeli and Hamas Leaders
UK's Infected Blood Scandal: Conclusion Nears After Seven Years
Julian Assange Granted Right to Challenge US Extradition
Congo Army Thwarts Attempted Coup Involving Americans and a British Citizen
Ireland's Homeless Gain Voting Rights
Blinken orders crackdown on Israel-Hamas leaks
Julian Assange Faces US Extradition: Key Facts
Jacob Zuma Takes Campaign to ANC Stronghold Soweto
Attempted Assassination of Slovakia PM Robert Fico: Investigation Ongoing
What Happens If an Iranian President Dies in Office?
Spain Recalls Ambassador After Argentina President's Remarks
Rishi Sunak Faces Cabinet Backlash Over Proposed Changes to Foreign Student Visas
Rwanda Denies Entry to Human Rights Researcher
Iranian President Ebrahim Raisi Reportedly Killed in Helicopter Crash
Blue Origin Resumes Space Tourism with 90-Year-Old Ed Dwight
Rishi Sunak and Wife Akshata Murty Wealthier Than King Charles
New Dutch Government Drives Wedge Through EU Liberals
Iranian President Raisi Missing After Helicopter Goes Down
Freemasons and ‘Global War Party’ Accused of Conspiring Against Georgia
Poland Supports Rolls-Royce's Nuclear Power Plant Initiative
European Ports Overflow with Unsold Electric Vehicles
Esprit Files for Bankruptcy in Europe, Putting Hundreds of Jobs at Risk
Chevron Halts North Sea Drilling Amid Rising Tax Burden
Jeremy Hunt Accused of Exaggerating Conservatives' Economic Record
Victoria Atkins Discusses Historical Gender Bias in the NHS
Dublin and Monaghan Bombings 50th Anniversary: Calls for Justice
Rishi Sunak and Akshata Murty’s Wealth Rises to £651 Million
New Caledonia Riots Escalate After French Voting Rights Change
Renters Face Fierce Competition as Listing Times Shrink
Surge in Fake Science: 19 journals shut down due to fraudulent papers from 'paper mills'
Global Birthrates Decline, Raising Economic and Social Concerns
Boeing Faces Possible Prosecution Over 737 MAX Settlement Violation
Prisoner Escapes in France as Two Officers Killed in Van Ambush
German Court Rules AfD Can Be Monitored for Extremism
Jacob Rees-Mogg Criticizes Bank of England’s Inflation Strategy
×